“Time is what we want most, but what we use worst.”
- William Penn

How many valuable cybersecurity tasks have you put aside due to the pressures of time? Time is currency and we spend it every moment we’re protecting our enterprises.

When we are constantly tuning, supporting and maintaining our security controls or chasing down an alert from an MSSP, only to discover it’s yet another false positive, we spend precious currency. When we create new correlation logic in our SIEM or decide which signatures to tune down to lower the volume of events to make it more manageable for our security team, we spend precious currency. When we analyze events from a SIEM to determine if they’re malicious and actionable or if a SIEM rule needs additional refinement, we spend precious currency. When we hire and train new analysts to cover churn, then watch them leave for a new opportunity – we waste currency and the investment hurts.

You can spend your “currency” doing pretty much anything, which is a blessing and a curse. We can (and do) waste an inordinate amount of time going down rabbit holes chasing false positives. We are forced to make choices: do we push back a request while we investigate the MSSP escalations or do we delay an investigation to provide the service agility the enterprise requires?

Both options are important, and both need addressing; forcing us to make a choice. In our gut we think the escalation is another false positive, but as cybersecurity professionals; we wait for the sword of Damocles to fall. It’s only a matter of time before one of these escalations is related to the thing we worry about most in our environments. Either way, something gets delayed…. hopefully just lunch.

Basing decisions on what we can neglect is reactive and unsustainable. It’s a matter of time until we choose to postpone the wrong thing.

We need to use our time more wisely.

Organizations need to spend precious “currency” focusing on higher value tasks, like threat hunting, that motivate their talent and provide value to the organization. But also need to maintain two hands on the wheel of lower value tasks that still need attention.

Organizations should implement automation tools to focus on the lower-value, repetitive tasks such as high-volume network security monitoring. Generating and receiving alerts from your security controls is easy, making sense and determining if they’re malicious and actionable is a different story. The decision to escalate events is typically inconsistent and heavily relies on the analyst making the decision. Factor in the amount of time required to gather supporting evidence and then make a decision, while doing this an additional 75 times an hour. As a defender, you don’t have enough “currency of time” to make consistent, highly-accurate decisions. Security analysts tasked with monitoring high-noise, low-signal event feeds is a misallocation of time that only leads to a lack of job satisfaction and burnout.

There is another way.

Employing Respond Analyst is like adding a virtual team of expert, superhuman analysts and will allow your team to, bring their talent and expertise to threat hunting. Adding Respond Analyst allows your talent to focus on higher value tasks and more engaging work so you can combat analyst burnout, training drains, and churn.

Steven Wimmer

For over the past 10 years Steven has built and matured security operations, and hunt teams for companies across the globe. Steven Wimmer has provided strategic and operational consulting to over 20 companies globally, including end to end SOC builds, hunt teams, and incident response. Prior to his role as Senior Technical Account Manager at Respond Software, Steven worked on developing hunt operations and cyber intelligence services at HP Enterprise. Steven is a seasoned cybersecurity veteran with a focus on developing and improving security operations in all verticals.

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